Exercises While Sitting in a Chair

Exercises, Diets, Nutrition, Vitamins, Health, Coping, gardening, herbal remedies, truncal lymphedema, chronic illness, breathing, stress, arm exercises, leg exercises, water exercises, low impact exercises, weight training, chair exercises, resistance exercises, stretch exercises, lymphatic drainage, detox patches

Moderators: jenjay, Cassie, patoco, Birdwatcher, Senior Moderators

Exercises While Sitting in a Chair

Postby patoco » Sun Jun 11, 2006 5:23 am

Exercises While Sitting in a Chair

Our Home Page: Lymphedema People

http://www.lymphedemapeople.com

===========

Chair Exercises

Exercise builds strong bones and slows the progress of osteoporosis. It also tones your muscles and helps you move about more easily by keeping joints, tendons and ligaments more flexible. You should engage in weight-bearing exercises such as walking (considered one of the best methods of maintaining bone strength), jogging, hiking, climbing stairs, dancing, weight training, etc. It is important to tailor your exercise program to fit your own level of ability and special needs.

Most older people, even those 85 and over and people with illnesses or disabilities, can take part in moderate exercise programs. Here are some exercises developed by the President's Council on Physical Fitness and Sports. The exercises are arranged in three levels of difficulty. Once you have successfully completed all the exercises in Level 1, proceed to the next level. Remember, it may take several months to attain the minimal levels of physical fitness identified in Level 1 activities. Some will take less time, others more.

Preparing the body for exercise is important for persons at any age and all fitness levels. Before doing any of these exercises, it is suggested that you warm-up. A warm-up period should begin with slow, rhythmic activity such as walking. Gradually increase the intensity until your pulse rate, respiration rate and body temperature are elevated. It also is advisable to do some easy stretching exercises before moving on to these activities. Remember before beginning any exercise program, you should discuss the program with your doctor and follow the doctor's advice.

Level 1

Shoulder Shrug 1. For the upper back, to tone shoulders and relax the muscles at the base of the neck. Lift shoulders way up, then relax them. Suggested repetitions: 8-10

Sitting Single Leg Raises 2. To strengthen hip flexor muscles and tone lower abdominal wall. Sit erect, hands on side of chair seat for balance, legs extended at angle to floor. Raise left leg waist high. Return to starting position. Suggested repetitions: 10-15 each leg.

Knee Lift 3. To strengthen hip flexors and lower abdomen. Stand erect. Raise left knee to chest or as far upward as possible. Return to starting position. Suggested repetitions: 5 each leg.

Leg Extensions 4. To tone the upper leg muscles. Sit upright. Lift left leg off the floor and extend it fully. Lower it very slowly. Suggested repetitions: 10- 15 each leg.

Back Leg Swing 5. To firm buttocks and strengthen the lower back. Stand erect behind chair, feet together, hands on chair back for support. Lift one leg back and up as far as possible keeping knee straight. Return to starting position. Suggested repetitions: 10 each leg.

Quarter Squat 6. To tone and strengthen lower leg muscles. Stand erect behind a chair, hands on chair for balance. Bend knees, then rise to an upright position. Suggested repetitions: 8-12.

Exercise builds strong bones and slows the progress of osteoporosis. It also tones your muscles and helps you move about more easily by keeping joints, tendons and ligaments more flexible. You should engage in weight-bearing exercises such as walking (considered one of the best methods of maintaining bone strength), jogging, hiking, climbing stairs, dancing, weight training, etc. It is important to tailor your exercise program to fit your own level of ability and special needs. Most older people, even those 85 and over and people with illnesses or disabilities, can take part in moderate exercise programs.

Here are some exercises developed by the President's Council on Physical Fitness and Sports. The exercises are arranged in three levels of difficulty. Once you have successfully completed all the exercises in Level 1, proceed to the next level. Remember, it may take several months to attain the minimal levels of physical fitness identified in Level 1 activities. Some will take less time, others more. Preparing the body for exercise is important for persons at any age and all fitness levels. Before doing any of these exercises, it is suggested that you warm-up. A warm-up period should begin with slow, rhythmic activity such as walking. Gradually increase the intensity until your pulse rate, respiration rate and body temperature are elevated.

It also is advisable to do some easy stretching exercises before moving on to these activities. Remember before beginning any exercise program, you should discuss the program with your doctor and follow the doctor's advice.

Level 1

Shoulder Shrug 1. For the upper back, to tone shoulders and relax the muscles at the base of the neck. Lift shoulders way up, then relax them. Suggested repetitions: 8-10

Sitting Single Leg Raises 2. To strengthen hip flexor muscles and tone lower abdominal wall. Sit erect, hands on side of chair seat for balance, legs extended at angle to floor. Raise left leg waist high. Return to starting position. Suggested repetitions: 10-15 each leg.

Knee Lift 3. To strengthen hip flexors and lower abdomen. Stand erect. Raise left knee to chest or as far upward as possible. Return to starting position. Suggested repetitions: 5 each leg.

Leg Extensions 4. To tone the upper leg muscles. Sit upright. Lift left leg off the floor and extend it fully. Lower it very slowly. Suggested repetitions: 10- 15 each leg.

Back Leg Swing 5. To firm buttocks and strengthen the lower back. Stand erect behind chair, feet together, hands on chair back for support. Lift one leg back and up as far as possible keeping knee straight. Return to starting position. Suggested repetitions: 10 each leg.

Quarter Squat 6. To tone and strengthen lower leg muscles. Stand erect behind a chair, hands on chair for balance. Bend knees, then rise to an upright position. Suggested repetitions: 8-12.

Level 2

Arm Curl 1. To strengthen arm muscles. Use a weighted object such as a book or can of vegetables (not more than five pounds). Stand or sit erect with arms at sides, holding weighted object. Bend your arm, raising the weight. Lower it. (Can be done seated.) Suggested repetitions: 10-15 each arm.

Modified Knee Push-Up 2. To strengthen upper back, chest, and back of arms. Start on bent knees, hands on floor under and slightly forward of shoulders. Lower body until chin touches the floor. Return to start. Suggested repetitions: 5-10.

Side Lying Leg Lift 3. To strengthen and tone outside of thigh and hip muscles. Lie on right side, legs extended. Raise left leg as high as possible. Lower to starting position. Suggested repetitions: 10 each side.

Alternate Leg Lunges 4. To strengthen upper thighs and inside of leg. Also stretches back of leg. Take a comfortable stance with hands on hips. Step forward 18" to 24" with right leg, while extending arms straight ahead. Keep left heel on floor. Shove off right leg and resume standing position. Suggested repetitions: 5-10 each leg.

Level 3 (In Level 3 strength exercises, lightweight resistance equipment, such as a dumbbell, is used. If you do not have a dumbbell available, a number of substitutes can be used. These include a bucket of soil or a heavy household item such as an iron, can of food, stone or brick.)

Seated Alternate Dumbbell Curls 1. To strengthen biceps of upper arms. Sit comfortably on a flat bench with arms at sides. Hold a pair of dumbbells with an underhand grip, so that palms face up. Bending left elbow, raise dumbbell until left arm is fully flexed. Lower left dumbbell while raising right dumbbell from the elbow until right arm is fully flexed. Breathe normally. Suggested repetitions: 1 to 2 sets of 6-10 repetitions each arm.

Alternate Dumbbell Shrug 2. To strengthen muscles in shoulders, upper back and neck. Stand comfortably with dumbbells in each hand. Elevate shoulders as high as possible, rolling them first backward and then down to the starting position. On the second repetition, roll the shoulders forward and down. Alternate first backward and then forward. Exhale as you lower the shoulders. Suggested repetitions: 10 (5 forward, 5 backward).

Dumbbell Calf Raise 3. To strengthen calf muscle and improve range of motion of ankle joint. Stand with feet shoulder-width apart, weights in each hand. Raise up on toes lifting heels as high as possible. Slowly lower heels to starting position. Breathe normally. Suggested repetitions: 5 with heels straight back, 5 with heels turned out, 5 with heels turned in.

Dumbbell Half Squats 4.

To strengthen thigh muscles in front. Stand with feet shoulder-width apart and heels on a 2' x 4' block (not necessary, but preferred). Holding weights in each hand, slowly descend to a comfortable position where the tops of the thighs are about at a 45 degree angle to the floor. Inhale on the way down. Ascend to the upright position with knees slightly bent. Exhale on the way up. Suggested repetitions: 10-12.

Walking A

weight-bearing exercise, such as brisk walking, is one of the best all-around activities for you. It helps improve the flow of blood to the heart and strengthens the leg muscles. Choose a comfortable time of day to walk, not too soon after eating or when the air temperature is too high. Start walking 1/4 mile each day the first two weeks, 1/2 mile each day the third week, 3/4 mile the fourth week and 1 mile the fifth week. Start walking five days a week with a target of one mile each day the sixth week. Be careful not to overexert. Stop if you find yourself panting, feeling nauseous, if your breathing does not return to normal within 10 minutes after exercising or if your sleep is affected.

Source: "Pep Up Your Life, A Fitness Book for Seniors," President's Council on Physical Fitness and Sports. Copyright 1991 American Association of Retired Persons. Reprinted with permission. (For a free brochure on exercise tips call the Academy's public service telephone number (800) 824-BONES or send a stamped, self addressed business size envelope to Prevent Injuries America!-exercise, American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, P.O. Box 2068, Des Plaines, IL. 60017.)

February 2002
More Information Provided by AAOS

http://orthoinfo.aaos.org/fact/thr_repo ... ss&all=all

-----------

Exercise While Sitting in a Chair

by Rachel Keller

Too many of us spend too much time sitting, either in work-related jobs, computer time, or relaxation in front of the television. If you sit in front of a computer for a long time, your neck and shoulder may get stiff, and you may even suffer occasional lower back pain.

You will feel so much better if you can get up every hour or so and walk around or stretch for a couple minutes.

A stretching break can make a big difference in your productivity, your ability to handle stress, and your overall well-being. It reduces muscular fatigue, tension, pain, and degenerative joint or disc problems and energizes parts of your body that have become stiff.

But what happens if you can't get up? While gently massaging those muscles may help, you can also do certain exercises to aid in flexibility and strength training.

These exercises you can do while sitting. (I have even done a few of these exercises in a meeting, and no one has ever known.) When doing these stretches, keep in mind these few suggestions:

· Never force a stretch.
· Do these stretches slowly and carefully.
· You may feel some tension. This is normal, but you should not experience pain.
· Hold only a stretch that feels good.

Exercises for the Lower Body

1. While seated, slowly point your toes forward away from your body until you feel a slight tension. Hold for 20-30 seconds.

2. While resting your heel on the floor, pull your feet and toes back toward your body. Hold for 20-30 seconds.

3. Slowly rotate your feet clockwise several times and then counterclockwise.

4. You can trace the alphabet and numbers with your feet.

5. Extend your leg and rest your foot on a towel. While you pull on the towel, push with your foot. (This one feels really good!)

6. This one is good for strengthening your leg muscles. Extend your leg out in front of you and hold for about 20 to 30 seconds. Lower your leg sooner if it starts to quiver. As your leg gets stronger, you can add ankle weights if you are interested in strengthening your leg muscles even more. You can do one leg at a time or hold both up together.

©Rachel Keller - All Rights Reserved. Reprinted with permission. For more of Rachel's work, please visit her sites Rachel's Writings and Kozy Kitchen Korner.

http://www.timeforfitness.com/exercise/chair.htm

-----------

Exercises You Can Do With A Chair

With work, family obligations and the odd night out with the guys, it's probably hard for you to find time to get to the gym on a regular basis. That's why it's always a great idea to have a back-up workout option that you can do with minimal equipment in the privacy of your own home. By using a bit of creativity, you can find various ways of challenging your body with the added benefit of stimulating your mind due to a break from the usual routine. In the following workout, the only piece of equipment you need is a chair and a half-hour of free time.

For each exercise, perform 2 sets of 12 to 15 reps.

Step-Ups

Stand a comfortable distance away from a sturdy chair, facing the seat. Slowly raise your right leg and place your entire foot on the seat. Push yourself up until your second foot is on the chair as well. Then, lower your left foot back down to the floor. Once you are in the starting position again, repeat the process. Once all reps are completed, switch sides.

Benefits: This exercise is great for targeting your quad and gluteus maximus muscles, giving you strong, powerful legs.

The Plank

Place both feet on the seat of the chair and form a "table" with your body by placing your elbows on the floor in front of the chair (you may wish to put down a towel if you are on a hard floor). Make sure your back isn't arched and that your whole body forms a straight line. Keep your core muscles tight and hold this position for up to one minute.

Benefits: This total-body exercise will work your core muscles as well as your upper body, which is required to support your weight. For an added challenge, try slowly raising one leg into the air behind you. This will increase the demand on your balance and thus further stimulate your abdominal muscles.

Pushups

Get into the same position as for the plank, but instead of balancing on your elbows, place your hands on the floor shoulder-width apart. Then, begin to perform a pushup, keeping your feet on the chair. Be sure not to let your back arch while performing this exercise.

Benefits: Your chest muscles will be primarily targeted, with the triceps being called into play as a synergistic muscle group.

One-Legged Squats

Stand a few feet in front of the chair, facing away from it. Place one leg behind you on the seat of the chair and find your balance. Slowly lower your hips as far as you can go, using the muscles in your standing leg. Once at the bottom, carefully rise up again to complete one rep.

Benefits: This is another great action for targeting your gluteus maximus muscle, as well as your hamstrings and quadriceps. Due to the nature of this exercise, you will also work on your balance.

Work your triceps, calves, back, and more...

Tricep Dips

Sit on the chair with your arms at your sides and your palms resting on the edge of the seat. Next, walk your body out from the chair so you are only holding on by your palms. Slowly move your body down, using your triceps to lower yourself and rise up again.

Benefits: You will feel a good burn in the back of your arms (triceps). For an added challenge, you can also put your feet on the seat of another chair or on an exercise ball.

Calf Raises

On a very stable chair, stand with both feet on the seat, heels hanging off the edge. Slowly, while hanging onto another object if you have balance difficulties, lower and rise up again, mimicking the action of a calf raise you would do at the gym.

Benefits: This exercise will primarily target your calf muscles and will help you work on your balance.

Superman

Lie with your stomach across the seat of the chair; the majority of your weight should be off the chair and on your feet. Then, with your arms stretched out on either side of your head, lower and rise up using the muscles in your upper back. Try to focus on only using your trapezius and latissimus dorsi muscles, and not your hamstrings.

Benefits: The primary target is your upper back, namely your traps and lats.

Front Raises

Stand up and hold onto the two front legs of the chair with a sturdy grasp. Slowly raise the chair straight out in front of you, from below the waist to shoulder level and back down again.

Benefits: You will target your frontal deltoids.

Military Press

Holding the chair legs, slowly bring the chair above your head and press up as you would in the military press machine at the gym. Just be careful not to hit yourself on the head with the chair.

Benefits: This exercise will target your frontal deltoids again, but it will also call into play the medial deltoids.

Hip Raises

Lie on your back facing the seat of the chair. Rest your heels on the chair with your knees slightly bent. Then, using your hamstring muscles, squeeze your glute muscles and bring your hips up to form a line with your body. Hold for a second and lower again to complete one rep.

Benefits: This movement primarily hits your hamstring muscles, with the gluteus muscles acting as synergistic helpers.
no excuses

Next time you are feeling pressed for time, don't just give up on your workout. With some imagination, you can create your own workout at home using common household objects that will stimulate your body in new ways, thus preventing you from reaching a plateau.

Even if time isn't a factor and you could have made it to the gym, it's never a bad idea to take a few sessions away, both to give you a psychological break, as well as to give your body some time away from the customary movements you have been performing. As always, ensure you are using proper form to avoid injuries, and take a day off in between each workout so you do not risk overtraining.

http://www.askmen.com/sports/bodybuildi ... s_tip.html
patoco
Site Admin
 
Posts: 2175
Joined: Thu Jun 08, 2006 9:07 pm

Postby silkie » Sat Jun 24, 2006 1:13 pm

Hi Pat

I LOVE THE CHAIR EXCERCISES

Any one can do them

And you if you remember NO STRAIN NO PAIN

then even the smallest movement improves woth a regular routine

I also love when i am sat at my computor to have my head set on and

my music on. And i dance from the waist up on my chair

Even pelvic excercise can be done on a chair.

I also have a soccer ball (achildrens one not a match ball)
the soccer ball is under my deskand i move it round with my feet it keeps my legs from geing still while sitting
You can also put the ball on top of your feey legs slightly apart and do lifts with the ball

any one else improvise i'd love new ideas to try

Hugsssssssssssss

Silks xxxxxxxxxx
User avatar
silkie
 
Posts: 383
Joined: Fri Jun 09, 2006 4:43 pm
Location: England


Return to Lymphedema Lifestyles

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests


cron